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Bromance

=ADK= Members
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Everything posted by Bromance

  1. Coming Back

    Not a lot if anything going on around here. Just randomly checked up ol ADK and found discord not working, forums almost dead, no servers any more... No new recruitment posts... Thanks for logging in today!!!!!
  2. Post Scriptum

    Free steam key for Post Scriptum first come first use: 9CTAE-6BNV7-DV0WB
  3. Anthem

    First three get access to the demo from now till the 27th (tomorrow). https://www.ea.com/games/anthem/anthem-demos/redeem?token=eG8vMTV4az0jTSMxMDAwMDIxMDIxNjcx https://www.ea.com/games/anthem/anthem-demos
  4. Hey everyone! Long time no see/visit!!! Hope everyone is doing great!

    1. LaithSJ

      LaithSJ

      Hi buddy, great to see you back, missing you Bromance <3 , missing playing BF4 with ya man . come back . 

    2. CaGregorio

      CaGregorio

      Whats up Bromance, long time, hope all is well.  

  5.   There's a war going on in the video game world, but it's over dollar signs, not virtual land. A boxed copy of Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3, the world's top-selling console game, costs $60.Angry Birds, the world's biggest mobile game franchise, costs $1 for software that you can download in under a minute. The pricing gap between what's traditionally considered the highest-tier premium games and the fast-evolving mobile, tablet, and social gaming market is widening, and it's spelling disaster for countless game makers caught in the middle. According to The NPD Group, physical content sales were down 8% in 2011. This year hasn't been a cakewalk either, with sales continuing to slide. Though some of the blame can rightfully be foisted upon the decline of the once-mighty Wii, it's apparent that people aren't buying games like they used to, and the industry is scrambling to figure out why. But most agree that it begins — and likely ends — with the high cost of new games. The sentiment that games cost too much is certainly not new. Wired's Chris Kohler recently outlined a list of reasons games cost too much and combated the argument that the used game market can be blamed. Nexon America's CEO Daniel Kim told GamesIndustry International that "Free-to-Play" games (often called "Freemium" because users are incentivized to pay small premiums for more content) are not going away and the traditional model will have to change. He's right. $60 has always been an embarrassing, crippling barrier of entry compared to gaming's entertainment peers. A brand new book, DVD, or CD rarely breaks the $20 mark, and even the highest tier Blu-rays cap out at around $30. Why are new games so pricey? Publishers have long blamed console games' high price on a plethora of issues. Skyrocketing development costs is a biggie, as is piracy. Most recently, publishers are taking aim at the used game market, charging that the buying and selling of used merchandise is taking cash out of their pockets.But whatever impact on profitability these concerns have, it doesn't change two monumental problems: - Psychologically, $60 just sounds expensive. This isn't anecdotal, this is common sense.  Unless you're financially independent, $60 outright repels a vast slice of the entertainment consumer populace that the games industry desperately needs to convert to grow and survive. - People are having fun playing more affordable games. The choice and product quality at the bottom end of the pricing scale -- anything under $15 or so -- has grown tremendously in a relatively short period of time. Games like Draw Something, Angry Birds, and Infinity Blade aren't only played by 'casual' gamers. That being said, the top perennial franchises like Halo, Elder Scrolls, Battlefield, and Madden aren't going anywhere, at least for a while longer. Games that critics and consumers universally laud as "must-haves" can continue to support this massive premium.  But it's the mid-tier titles, the unestablished IPs, the riskier endeavors, the worthwhile games that don't quite master the magic formula, that will never get off the ground. Even highly-praised franchise entries like Rayman Origins struggle, and publishers like THQ have been threatened with NASDAQ delisting despite enjoying sales that "exceed expectations." Black Rock, creators of critical darlings Pure and Split/Second, were denied sequels by publisher Disney to focus on freemium content and eventually shuttered entirely. The most egregious example of old-school thinking is the release of Plants vs. Zombies on PlayStation Vita.  One of the rarer "crossover" successes, the game costs $3 on the iPhone but a whopping  $15 on the Vita for an identical product. Why? Because it's a dedicated gaming device and core gamers are accustomed to paying higher premiums. How long can this madness last? It's not just Facebook and smartphones that threaten to steal that audience. The consoles themselves have thriving online stores in Xbox Live Arcade and PlayStation Network, offering gaming alternatives with high production value and more relaxed pricing. Just look to successes like Battlefield 1943 (over 1MM units sold), Xbox's Castle Crashers (sold 2.6 million), and recent PS3 hit Journey, which quickly became the PSN's fastest-selling title ever. If the Old Guard would just drop the charade that $60 is the only feasible price point, they might find an unexpectedly higher volume of purchasers to mitigate the reduced revenue per gamer. I realize that the $60 Call of Duty costs some tens of millions more to develop, market, and distribute than the $1 Angry Birds, but is there really a $59 differential there? Someone wiser than me in economics can surely model up a theory that finds a middle ground.   [url=http://www.adkgamers.com/index.html/_/gaming-news/why-the-end-of-the-60-video-game-is-near-r252]Click here to view the article[/url]
  6. Graphics cards and processors

    Other than used ones on e-bay, can't recommend a cheap budget card.
  7. GTX 980 TI vs GTX 1080 TI vs Volta

    Agreed.. I generally wait 0ne release cycle myself too.
  8. OneLogin Suffers Data Breach

    Security is a vicious circle. The easier you make tech usable (web based) the easier it is for a person to compromise it. yet the harder you make it the harder the average user can use it. There are a lot of people I wonder how they can even use their smart phones to call someone after some of the support tickets I have seen..
  9. Netgear - Nighthawk x10 Router

    Aint going to help crappy isp's. Only your home network.
  10. Better CPU or GPU for Battlefield 1?

    An I3 isn't going to cut it for a lot of games. Open your task manager and alt tab while you're playing. You'll see your cpu usage in a graph. Over 70% it's actually maxed out as most games try not to use 100%. I have a 6 core i7 and in bf1 uses 40-60% cpu average.
  11. Geforce GTX 1070 or 1080?

    I quit overclocking years ago. Just don't want the hassle and warranty issues.. But on a side note: A lot of times the "factory Overclocked" cards, you pay a premium for minor OC. I personally just get the best reference card I can afford and go. Still run a 970 that runs BF1 great.
  12. Feedback

    I'm all about trying out new tech and giving it a go. Seems legit to me, but it's different and not quite as easy to get started as people are used to with ts. That whole change when thingy isn't where it normally is can be hard for people to grasp even if it's better and cheaper.
  13. There's a war going on in the video game world, but it's over dollar signs, not virtual land. A boxed copy of Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3, the world's top-selling console game, costs $60.Angry Birds, the world's biggest mobile game franchise, costs $1 for software that you can download in under a minute. The pricing gap between what's traditionally considered the highest-tier premium games and the fast-evolving mobile, tablet, and social gaming market is widening, and it's spelling disaster for countless game makers caught in the middle. According to The NPD Group, physical content sales were down 8% in 2011. This year hasn't been a cakewalk either, with sales continuing to slide. Though some of the blame can rightfully be foisted upon the decline of the once-mighty Wii, it's apparent that people aren't buying games like they used to, and the industry is scrambling to figure out why. But most agree that it begins — and likely ends — with the high cost of new games. The sentiment that games cost too much is certainly not new. Wired's Chris Kohler recently outlined a list of reasons games cost too much and combated the argument that the used game market can be blamed. Nexon America's CEO Daniel Kim told GamesIndustry International that "Free-to-Play" games (often called "Freemium" because users are incentivized to pay small premiums for more content) are not going away and the traditional model will have to change. He's right. $60 has always been an embarrassing, crippling barrier of entry compared to gaming's entertainment peers. A brand new book, DVD, or CD rarely breaks the $20 mark, and even the highest tier Blu-rays cap out at around $30. Why are new games so pricey? Publishers have long blamed console games' high price on a plethora of issues. Skyrocketing development costs is a biggie, as is piracy. Most recently, publishers are taking aim at the used game market, charging that the buying and selling of used merchandise is taking cash out of their pockets.But whatever impact on profitability these concerns have, it doesn't change two monumental problems: - Psychologically, $60 just sounds expensive. This isn't anecdotal, this is common sense. Unless you're financially independent, $60 outright repels a vast slice of the entertainment consumer populace that the games industry desperately needs to convert to grow and survive. - People are having fun playing more affordable games. The choice and product quality at the bottom end of the pricing scale -- anything under $15 or so -- has grown tremendously in a relatively short period of time. Games like Draw Something, Angry Birds, and Infinity Blade aren't only played by 'casual' gamers. That being said, the top perennial franchises like Halo, Elder Scrolls, Battlefield, and Madden aren't going anywhere, at least for a while longer. Games that critics and consumers universally laud as "must-haves" can continue to support this massive premium. But it's the mid-tier titles, the unestablished IPs, the riskier endeavors, the worthwhile games that don't quite master the magic formula, that will never get off the ground. Even highly-praised franchise entries like Rayman Origins struggle, and publishers like THQ have been threatened with NASDAQ delisting despite enjoying sales that "exceed expectations." Black Rock, creators of critical darlings Pure and Split/Second, were denied sequels by publisher Disney to focus on freemium content and eventually shuttered entirely. The most egregious example of old-school thinking is the release of Plants vs. Zombies on PlayStation Vita. One of the rarer "crossover" successes, the game costs $3 on the iPhone but a whopping $15 on the Vita for an identical product. Why? Because it's a dedicated gaming device and core gamers are accustomed to paying higher premiums. How long can this madness last? It's not just Facebook and smartphones that threaten to steal that audience. The consoles themselves have thriving online stores in Xbox Live Arcade and PlayStation Network, offering gaming alternatives with high production value and more relaxed pricing. Just look to successes like Battlefield 1943 (over 1MM units sold), Xbox's Castle Crashers (sold 2.6 million), and recent PS3 hit Journey, which quickly became the PSN's fastest-selling title ever. If the Old Guard would just drop the charade that $60 is the only feasible price point, they might find an unexpectedly higher volume of purchasers to mitigate the reduced revenue per gamer. I realize that the $60 Call of Duty costs some tens of millions more to develop, market, and distribute than the $1 Angry Birds, but is there really a $59 differential there? Someone wiser than me in economics can surely model up a theory that finds a middle ground.
  14. Will You Be Buying Battlefield 1?

    Tried it out with the early edition ($5 Origin thing) and quite a lot of tweaks from the beta. To many to list, but the classes and gagets are now more inline with the other BF installments. Any case I bought it mainly for the Operations!!!! Rush but better (needs some balance updates though, attackers will almost never win two maps).
  15. Battlefield 1 Servers And What We Know

    Keep in mind the Procon developer got hired right after Hardline (ish time frame). I would guess he has a lot to do with the server administration. Might be decent tools. Unfortunately the way Game Devs are porting Console type of multiplayer (match makers, no community servers) this is better then nothing. While complainers complain those who enjoy the games just play and don't leave much feedback. Once again surprised for the aspect: (Example numbers!!!!!) 2 Million players 200,000 complaints That's 10%, and a small fraction to make huge changes yet most of the 200,000 still log more hours then the average player (LOLZ)
  16. BF1 PC upgrades!

    I blow the dust out of mine. Ready to go!!!
  17. Anyway We Could Revive This game as part of ADK

    I play almost daily in the evening. Only a few rounds, but add me if you play in the evenings. Yeah, the ADK team is worthless right now, but I have no problem starting a new one if we got active players.
  18. GTX 1080 Which Brand to Purchase?

    Branding is really irrelevant and more of a opinion. They are all the same hardware under the fans and heatsinks. Obviously you want to go with a reputable company. I had one GPU go out from BFG and they went out of business and Tiger Direct told me to move along.... With that said, just compare reviews, warranty and specs. Check the specs very carefully! There are some minor differences for the same price. I personally don't by overclocked cards UNLESS they are the same price as reference cards (default if you will). That way you save some cash and most come with software to OC them painlessly. So I don't see the point personally, and you only get a few FPS increase.
  19. Lan/Nic Issue

    Your connection speed (100mb) is par for a crappy router/modem. Has nothing to do with your network card. So check your modem and router and see which one is only 100mb and upgrade that.
  20. Wndows 10 SSD Optimization

    Yes and no. Yes you can, but it requires you to set up symlinks (symbolic links). This also would defeat the purpose of an SSD. Currently the communication link is the bottleneck (the sata cable) on most ssd's. Using the motherboard's chipset to connect two Hard Drives together (C drive and D drive) is inefficient and causes issues. Windows 10 requires 20Gb of space to install, you shouldn't use anything less than a 100GB ssd, but in order to feel the performance of an SSD you really need all software (drivers, OS, games) on the ssd and now with TB drives available no reason not to. Generally the D drive is used for files and software that you don't use often.
  21. Battlefield 1: Realism vs Playability

    No respawn, wounded slow down, no regen health, not weapon pickups and ammo without animation etc. No fun...
  22. Testing 0.5.9 update

    New Cooperative Battles Since the earliest versions of the game, Cooperative Battles existed as a lighter version of Random Battles. Despite the casual manner of these PvE battles (or perhaps because of it), a lot of you have enjoyed playing against bots, cooperating with other players rather than competing with them. In Update 0.5.9, we're adding a new mode called "Assault" to the Cooperative Battles rotation. In Assault, you'll stand firm against superior enemy forces, and unlike regular co-op battles, this mode has a few twists. Available when playing with tier IV-VIII ships. Assault is for tiers IV-VII,. and special scenarios on each of the following maps: Strait (tiers IV-VI): Players attack an enemy base Fault Line (tiers V-VII): Players defend two bases Estuary (tiers VI-VIII): Players defend two bases The future of Cooperative Battles considerably depends on the feedback that we will receive from you. Don't hesitate to let us know what you think about Assault! Voice Chat in Divisions To help you overcome great challenges in PvP and PvE, we have added built-in voice chat for easier communication when in a Division. Visibility System Improved The visibility system, spotting ranges, and how smoke screens conceal your movement were sometimes difficult for Players to to fully understand. For this reason, we've made a couple of major changes to the visibility system, with the overall objective of making it clearer to Players. We've added an option to enable the display of the edges of a smokescreen on the water's surface. This should help players see the real edge of the smokescreen and plan their actions better in the heat of battle. Situation Awareness is a popular Skill which displays a notification about the detection of enemy ships. It's being given to everyone by default and removed from the Commander Skills tree.
  23. Battlefield 1

    All the BF's since 3 have been very CPU intensive. In order to get and keep a steady FPS make sure you have a good CPU first. I run a Hexi-core 6700 and with BF4 it's a steady 60% usage. Frostbite does take advantage of multi-cores well. For GPU I run a single 970 and in high settings lock at 120FPS. It does dip to around a 100 on large maps when I am in a firefight with lots of players. Assume that BF1 will be more brutal with the added destruction.
  24. 0.5.8 Update - Battle of the Bastions

    Not a huge fan of high tier matches, but suffered through it for about 40 rounds. Didn't hit the bastion mode once. Son of a gun. Usually when a new map is released it's heavy in the rotation, guess the mode NOPE.
  25. Game devs?

    They have a free version that can get you started. Few easy tutorials on Youtube and the site. It's basicly html5 and javascript for making browser games. You can make a tetris clone in a day if you wanted. I just created a plugin for it to communicate with our site so I learned it enough in less than a week. https://www.scirra.com/construct2 http://gamesmart.com
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