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slipitin

New Build help, What motherboard?

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I'm looking for a little direction. I'm not sure what direction to go in. I want to get the most I can and leave room to upgrade. I want a second station I'm giving my old not to my son. I want to be around 1000-1200 for the tower I have keyboard, mouse, monitors. I started researching and I got lost in the motherboard selection. Any help would be great.

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What motherboard you want to get depends on the CPU you're getting. Different motherboards have different CPU sockets for different CPUS. Most motherboards have the same GPU socket I think, so you shouldn't have to worry about that. Just post what parts you have figured out you're getting and I might be able to help you out.

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You need to decide what CPU you desire (as stated above) and list the features you want. IE: 6gb sata drive, onboard audio, onboard wifi, USB 3.0, PCI-e slots, size of mobo (for case size) and whether or not your going to OC your system. Once you get the features you "need" narrowed down that will help you narrow your search for mobo's. 

 

After using MSI, Foxcon, Evga, and Gigabyte I have decided on Asus boards for price to features. But Asus doesn't have the best support like Evga, BUT they seem to hold up better and have less issues. Many times the reviews on Newegg will show a HUGE difference in a pro version versus a deluxe version etc. 

 

Your Mobo is a huge part that needs to be right in order for your system to mesh properly and support future upgrades if needed. If at any point you need to replace your mobo for an upgrade to be done either your PC build wasn't planned right or it is just time to upgrade! As new CPU's are released with either new sockets or require Bios updates some manufactures will just release new Mobo's for sales (YOU Evga) which is another pro for Asus.

 

Most boards come with it, but things to look for:

Just because it supports the CPU socket doesn't mean it supports the CPU (Very important)

Enough expansion and memory slots? (Always try to run in dual channel so two sticks, speeds thing up a bit versus many sticks)

Ensure if you plan on SLI or Crossfire the PCI slots are dual x-16

Dual sata controllers. Run your primary HD on one controller and everything else on the other (Intel boards have Intel and Marvel)

Enough USB and USB 3.0 on the BACK for your needs. Using the back USB reduces lag and EMI issues from running from the front of your case where the connecting wiring runs around your Mobo and fans, etc causing interference.

As stated the features you need (on board audio or sound card? Wifi or not?)

 

Sometimes boards advertise the Overclocking abilities they offer, but charge a premium price where IF you do a little research MANY boards over almost the same ability with out the premium price tag. It is always better to run the best CPU you can afford and a Mobo that is a great Value (runs well but maybe less features) then a feature rich mobo and hope you can get more out of a cheaper CPU. Proven fact a stock clocked I7 CPU will out perform a OC i5 CPU that is OC'ed to meet the same settings as the I7. This also means less cooling requirements (lower cost for that) less mobo requirements(cheaper) and longer component life span. I also give my kids my old PC's so they need to run for 6-8 years and many times with only a new HD and GPU upgrade. With a few "budget" builds I wasn't able to do that type of life span for a number of reasons. 

 

@slipitin

Edited by Bromance

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great stuff!! if you had $1000 and you live down the street from Tiger direct what would you build. I mostly play Planetside 2.  I5? I7?

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I would always try to run an I7. For my 2nd oldest (oldest is in Collage now) I built him a budget system for around $1200 from Micro Center with an I5. He is cool with it but when I need to work on things or help tweak stuff I HATE IT. but I can't be sure of what he does to it as I don't want to know. Bad enough I use my own keyboard and mouse just in case...... 

 

Anyways, even when it was new (gigabyte mobo and I5 with a 560TI) and I was installing Windows and drivers it was doggy compared to my quad I7. For PS2 though an I5 is a great value along with AMD and should run it great but once again your longevity before it becomes a web browser machine (Remember the old E-machines??) is going to be less as applications become bigger and better. My youngest sons OLD I7 920 IMO (no facts or documentation) runs faster and seems more responsive than the newer I5. A lot has to do with the rest of the system so trying to compare apples to apples isn't possible but more of a feeling while I have to tinker. To be honest also I upgraded my CPU after Warspite did to a six core I7 so compare that to an I5 isn't going to be fair. I haven't been able to max it out in anyway shape of form yet with out trying. Even encoding and using Blender slows it, but not like when I had a Quad core. 

 

So if you can, work on trying to get an at least a quad I7 I promise you'll be VERY happy.

Edited by Bromance

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Asus is pretty much the only brand I consider for motherboards. Their prices are decent, and their quality in my experience has been the best out of the big 5 (Asrock, Asus, Biostar, MSI and Gigabyte).

 

I had a really horrible experience with Gigabyte, to be fair, its something that could have happened with any brand really, but theres my bias.

 

As mentioned, you kinda need to select a CPU first. If gaming is all your after, from the Intel side, i5s are all you really need, as most games are dependent on the graphics card being strong, the CPU to a lesser extent, and games only get a marginal bump from HyperThreading technology (the only difference between an i5 and an i7) AMD FX-8350s are also good choices, I personally love mine.

 

This is of course generic answers wtihout selecting a CPU first, but I wouldn't be too concerned as SLi/Crossfire performance as a selling point as a single stronger graphics card is generally a better way to go for a gaming system, your electric bill will thank you for that, also you won't need as high wattage of a power supply to accomodate.

 

A good quality motherboard should cost you at least 100 dollars, but really, just to keep the essentials, theres not much of a need to go above $150 unless you're looking into higher models for serious overclocking.

Edited by Neelix

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Asus is pretty much the only brand I consider for motherboards. Their prices are decent, and their quality in my experience has been the best out of the big 5 (Asrock, Asus, Biostar, MSI and Gigabyte).

 

I had a really horrible experience with Gigabyte, to be fair, its something that could have happened with any brand really, but theres my bias.

 

As mentioned, you kinda need to select a CPU first. If gaming is all your after, from the Intel side, i5s are all you really need, as most games are dependent on the graphics card being strong, the CPU to a lesser extent, and games only get a marginal bump from HyperThreading technology (the only difference between an i5 and an i7) AMD FX-8350s are also good choices, I personally love mine.

 

This is of course generic answers wtihout selecting a CPU first, but I wouldn't be too concerned as SLi/Crossfire performance as a selling point as a single stronger graphics card is generally a better way to go for a gaming system, your electric bill will thank you for that, also you won't need as high wattage of a power supply to accomodate.

 

A good quality motherboard should cost you at least 100 dollars, but really, just to keep the essentials, theres not much of a need to go above $150 unless you're looking into higher models for serious overclocking.

I thought the same thing until had two asus mobos die. Ever since I have been using MSI because I was too broke to afford asus and haven't looked back. If your going intel I would get the MSI H87-43G its around $110.

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I thought the same thing until had two asus mobos die. Ever since I have been using MSI because I was too broke to afford asus and haven't looked back. If your going intel I would get the MSI H87-43G its around $110.

Well, to be fair, anything mass produced runs the risk of having bad ones.. My thing with Gigabyte wasn't so much the failure itself, but the customer service or lackthereof to remedy the problem. They were not very knowledgeable, asked me to breadboard the system after I told them I had just done that. And couple that with the fact that the features of the particular board (990FX-UD5), was similarly priced to the Asus Sabertooth which had better features and 2 years longer warranty, as soon as the Gigabyte guy realized his call handle time was over 5 minutes, he abruptly told me to call Tigerdirect where I brought it from and pretty much hung up.. Called them, told them to send me a Sabertooth which they were more than happy to do.

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The I5 is cool for gaming debate...... But as stated depends on the game, but BF your I5 will bottleneck, proven with out a doubt fact. Yes hyper-threading can be insignificant but also depending as stated.

 

Under a $100 for a mobo? Well you can but not a new cutting edge full ATX board with the newest chipset. I 110% agree with your not worry about SLI as you will always get better performance WITH A SINGLE CARD (undisputed FACT a 2nd card will never double your output), but when planning a lot of times people don't think about it and 2 years down the road they want to pop in a new GPU to SLI and low and behold need a power supply, Mobo does SLI in x8 instead of x16 or the case won't support it. So in the planning stage it is important to keep all these things in the front of your mind.   

 

I dropped $2500 on my PC 3 years ago and since then I have bought a new I7 and a 2nd GPU for around $500 less then a year ago. Other than cleaning it I haven't had to touch, tweak, OC or anything since then to run any game or software I want. (part of that was two monitors and accessories). 

 

Now I have NEVER (and this is my personal experience) had a budget build ($1200 or less) perform good enough for 3 years and be cost effective to upgrade it, so you end up spending (possibly, but I always have) more money in the long run to keep up enough and still can be below the mark.

Add on my kids old I7 920 is still going and plays CS:go and games like that my kid plays with nothing over the last 6 years except a hard drive and a GPU (He is running a 6750 I think, ATI). So after $2000 to build, I have spend $300 over 6 years to keep it up to date enough for him. Many times I would have build three computers for $1000 or so a piece by then. 

 

Math wise I saved by switching to Go Big or Go Home.... Most of it though was planning and over preparing, some of it was want versus need but overall since I stopped building cheaper machines and compromising from what I wanted I have had a lot better success and happiness and a LOT less frustration. No, no $50 cases that are flimsy and loud. No cheap PSU's so they burn out annually, No buying cheaper GPU's and hope to OC it or buy one already OC'ed (doesn't mean I'll drop a grand on a titan.. little crazy there). I don't buy budget CPU's and plan on OC'ing them and have constant issues and lock ups.  just by the best I can afford and sit good for 5 years. I have NEVER been able to do that with a budget build. I have ALWAYS found my self tweaking and having issues at the worst times. 

 

Sorry, rambled a lot....

Edited by Bromance

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