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All,

 

In a previous thread I gave a somewhat tongue in cheek review of both my cable modem and its installation with Comcast.

 

Now that I've had the modem for a couple of weeks, I've noticed some significant improvements in the performance of my Internet connection that I thought I would share with you.

 

First, understand that upgrading your cable modem will NOT increase your bandwidth, as your bandwidth is determined by the tier of your Internet plan.

 

What upgrading your cable modem could do, depending on the modem you are currently using, is dramatically increase the quality of the Internet plan you are paying for.  The reason for this is that a recently as 3-4 years ago, the way that most of us use the Internet has changed dramatically.  We stream more... lots more.  Something that lots of us have noticed (me included) is that when we try stream media (YouTube, etc.) in HD, we often got the "buffering" dialogue even though many of us have service plans that should easily give us enough bandwidth.  This problem is made worse when multiple Internet-connected devices are operating on your network. If you have an older single-channel modem, it could very well be the source of your problem (as it was for me).

 

Who benefits the most from a modem upgrade?  Obviously, those of us who are running older, single-channel DOCSIS 2.0 (or earlier) modems.  I was one of those guys who went from a Motorola SB5100 to a SB6121.  DOCSIS 3.0 benefits aside, the real boost in performance that I've noticed has come from what is called "multiple channel bonding".  Channel bonding speaks to the number of Internet "channels" (up and down) that your modem is capable of bonding (tuning) to.  Now, my SB5100 could only bond to one channel up and down at 38-30MB/s.  This means that every packet going through the modem had to flow through a single point.  Now, when multiple devices on a network are connected to the Internet through a single channel, swings in data flow (up/down rate) across many sites and domains can create traffic management challenges within the modem.  It's kind of like one traffic cop trying to manage traffic though an 8-lane, 4-way intersection.  It can be pretty chaotic.

 

What multi channel bonding (the SB6121 bonds four up and down channels at 100MB/s) does is spread your bandwidth across four channels.  This (in combo with the modem's chipset) enables your modem to manage Internet traffic far more efficiently.  Imagine how much easier it is to get things done when three other friends who are just as strong, smart, and competent as you are come over to help.  If you're that lucky, it can make for some pretty light work.  It is even better when all four are well-led, as they are by the controller in the chipset.

 

What does this all mean?  I don't have a shred of increased bandwidth from upgrading my modem, but what I do have is awesome traffic management that optimizes the bandwidth I have.  I can now steam YouTube at 1080p and never buffer, even when I watch videos for hours and there are other folks (a.k.a. "kids") doing their youtubing, instagramming (and God knows what else).

 

So, if you are looking for an improved Internet experience, don't snap to increasing your service plan.  True, it could help, but if your network's infrastructure (modem, router, cabling, etc.) isn't up to snuff, you could be throwing lots of $ down the tubes for very little gain.  My new SB6121 was $70 on Amazon.com.  You may be able to get them cheaper.  Before you leap, make sure you Google your modem's model number (and any revision) to see how many channels it bonds.  If you're running a single-channel modem like I was, chances are you will get a lot more from your current plan if you upgrade your modem (not to mention that you may save some $ by no longer leasing your ISP's modem).  For me, that was $7/mo and my modem will pay for itself in just 10 months.  Totally worth it.

 

Bottom line.  Upgraded cable modem = improved experience (w/o upgrading my plan) that pays for itself in less than a year and saves me $84/year going forward.  Not bad at all.

 

war

Edited by =ADK= warspite

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I work for a local cable company in Orange County, CA. And I can tell you if you have a docsis 2.0 modem you need to upgrade it. There are lots of options out there for docsis 3.0 modems, from standalone to modem/router combos and dual band combos. Which can cost a lot of money, but in the ling run it is worth it. We are always making improvements to our system and everything we do now is on docsis 3.0 and has been for a while now. I know money is tight for people, put 5-10 dollars a month away and get it when you can. It is a good investment.

Amazon is the best price normally.

Otherwise if you are in orange county and looking for new service send me a message and I will see what I can do for you.

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I got the sb6121 as well and it has been great. Less timeouts on connections and better speed. Now if only Comcast could get their shit together.

 

 

No comment, wish i could help you........and good luck on that.  I have heard that alot about them.   Maybe try moving to a different city that does not have Comcast, that might work. 

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I dont think you guys know how bad it is out here. First this area used to be all Adelphia but then Comcast bought them out. I can feel for them in the respect that they had a shitty network to take over and have done a good job with speed and such, but the reliability is terrible. Thank god for my smart phone so i can turn in school work on time.

 

I get constant disconnects, connection dropouts, I reset my modem about 20 times a week (not an exaggeration), and getting a tech to your house is dam near impossible.  I remember one month I had to call a tech to my place 5 times in 2 weeks! WTF!

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Bottom line buying your own modem will pay for it's self (figuratively) with in 2 years. Having access to your modem to adjust and tweak settings is against the rules with rented modems.

 

I have a wireless/router modem and it works on par with any other gaming router I have had. Other then port forwarding not being as easy as selecting a game and IP (which shouldn't need to do anymore with modern networking code in the games), performance wise better or the same for the same price and now no rental fee.

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I dont think you guys know how bad it is out here. First this area used to be all Adelphia but then Comcast bought them out. I can feel for them in the respect that they had a shitty network to take over and have done a good job with speed and such, but the reliability is terrible. Thank god for my smart phone so i can turn in school work on time.

 

I get constant disconnects, connection dropouts, I reset my modem about 20 times a week (not an exaggeration), and getting a tech to your house is dam near impossible.  I remember one month I had to call a tech to my place 5 times in 2 weeks! WTF!

 

Yet you still do awesome in your games!!!

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umm question!

how did you get that picture thingy under your post!

 

Which picture thingy? If you are talking about the Grimreaper one, I made it myself. The BF3 one is something you can get here (http://bf3stats.com/graphics) there are lots to choose from.

 

The computers specs I typed under all that.

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Well with all of these smashing reviews for the 6121, I may pull the trigger on one.  Amazon has it for $65.  I guess it'll be a no-brainer considering I'm paying $4/month for my current cable modem.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Motorola-SB6121-SURFboard-DOCSIS-Cable/dp/B004XC6GJ0/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1364675565&sr=8-1&keywords=motorola+6121

 

On a side note, I purchased a new wifi router to replace my old Cisco e4200 that broke.  Don't laugh, but I got the Apple Airport Extreme.  All I have to say is ... WOW.  The range on this thing is amazing and so far it's rock solid and pretty fast.  Setup was as easy as any router I've ever worked with...it pretty much figured out my network setup and automatically set itself up in the proper mode (in my case, "bridge mode"). 

 

Love or hate Apple, they know how to make hardware that just plain works.  This router doesn't have the bells and whistles of most of your newer routers, but reliability is what is missing in most routers today and so far Apple has delivered in that category..  I've had Cisco, Dlink, Netgear, Linksys, Belkin routers over the years.  And, they ALL have craped out or became unreliable after just a year or two of use.   Hopefully, this Apple router will be my last for a long time.

Edited by jizackson

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I'm currently using a Linksys E2100L WiFi router that I converted to DD-WRT.  Since I changed firmware to DD-WRT, the router's performance has been amazing.  Even though I didn't do some of the stuff you can do with DD-WRT (overclock the CPU, boost the radio's output power, etc.), just using DD-WRT's basic configuration has made it far more stable.  The router used to crash several times a week, with DD-WRT, I've only had to reset it once or twice in the past few months.

 

With that said, I plan to upgrade my Linksys WiFi router to a Cisco SOHO gigabit router and continue to use my several WiFi routers as simple WiFi access points.  I think that having the cable modem connect directly to a gigabit SOHO router will give me far more stable performance.  It would be nice to have a gigabit connection between my PC and the Internet, even though my LAN needs nowhere near that bandwidth (yet  :D ).  As with all things, time will tell.

 

war

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I'm currently using a Linksys E2100L WiFi router that I converted to DD-WRT.  Since I changed firmware to DD-WRT, the router's performance has been amazing.  Even though I didn't do some of the stuff you can do with DD-WRT (overclock the CPU, boost the radio's output power, etc.), just using DD-WRT's basic configuration has made it far more stable.  The router used to crash several times a week, with DD-WRT, I've only had to reset it once or twice in the past few months.

 

With that said, I plan to upgrade my Linksys WiFi router to a Cisco SOHO gigabit router and continue to use my several WiFi routers as simple WiFi access points.  I think that having the cable modem connect directly to a gigabit SOHO router will give me far more stable performance.  It would be nice to have a gigabit connection between my PC and the Internet, even though my LAN needs nowhere near that bandwidth (yet  :D ).  As with all things, time will tell.

 

war

 

 

 

Or war, you can get the Buffalo routers with the DDWRT preinstalled. So far I have loved mine, but I have the HP verson, but this one is better:

http://www.amazon.com/BUFFALO-AirStation-HighPower-Wireless-WZR-600DHP/dp/B0096239G0/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1364696402&sr=8-2&keywords=buffalo+ddwrt

 

 

Not to mention I feel like that Cisco is just a name now. Nothing extrodinary about them at the consumer level.

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I tried installing Tomato firmware on my e4200 and it didn't help. 

 

Also, I didn't know Cisco was still making routers for home use..good to know.

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Or war, you can get the Buffalo routers with the DDWRT preinstalled. So far I have loved mine, but I have the HP verson, but this one is better:

http://www.amazon.com/BUFFALO-AirStation-HighPower-Wireless-WZR-600DHP/dp/B0096239G0/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1364696402&sr=8-2&keywords=buffalo+ddwrt

 

 

Not to mention I feel like that Cisco is just a name now. Nothing extrodinary about them at the consumer level.

 

Grim,

 

I agree.  That's why I would go with nothing less than a SOHO (Small Office/Home Office) level router.  Sometimes this level is called Prosumer.  One step above the chattel that normally passes for the mainstream consumer grade stuff.  Thanks for the link!!!  :) 

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I tried installing Tomato firmware on my e4200 and it didn't help. 

 

Also, I didn't know Cisco was still making routers for home use..good to know.

 

Jiz,

 

I've had this router for some time.  I'm pretty sure that Cisco did indeed get out of the consumer-level networking biz and are now focused on business-level networking.

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Cisco and Linksys are the same, linksys is home use. Cisco does have some (expensive) home use mainly for homes that are lan wired (switches, modems with 10+ wired connections, etc).

 

With you cable modem upgrade War, why didn't you get one that did wireless too?

 

my Motorola, I have NEVER had to reset it or mess around after I set it up. Kids, printers, and consoles all have zero issues. I would argue it is along the same performance level than my d-link gaming wireless router.

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http://www.digital-loggers.com/lpc.html

 

We deploy these at all of our sites to power cycle locked up radios or switches. I have been meaning to get one for my equipment just so I don't have to power cycle my modem when it drops :D . Easy as hell to setup, just plug in your devices to the outlets, attach it to the network, and set it to ping devices IP's and stipulate which outlet to turn off/on if a ping drops.

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Cisco and Linksys are the same, linksys is home use. Cisco does have some (expensive) home use mainly for homes that are lan wired (switches, modems with 10+ wired connections, etc).

 

With you cable modem upgrade War, why didn't you get one that did wireless too?

 

my Motorola, I have NEVER had to reset it or mess around after I set it up. Kids, printers, and consoles all have zero issues. I would argue it is along the same performance level than my d-link gaming wireless router.

 

Actually, I read recently that Cisco is selling their Linksys brand to Belkin and will no longer do home hardware.

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Cisco and Linksys are the same, linksys is home use. Cisco does have some (expensive) home use mainly for homes that are lan wired (switches, modems with 10+ wired connections, etc).

 

With you cable modem upgrade War, why didn't you get one that did wireless too?

 

my Motorola, I have NEVER had to reset it or mess around after I set it up. Kids, printers, and consoles all have zero issues. I would argue it is along the same performance level than my d-link gaming wireless router.

 

Bromance, I have 5-6 WiFi routers already.  I have 4 sub-nets in my house :D .   No matter where you go in my house, WiFi is booming!  I just didn't need another WiFi router, that's all.  Otherwise, I definitely would have gotten the one you did.  As I said earlier, I'm very happy with my router.  Streaming/YouTube HD has never been better.

 

war

 

P.S. Is Aries as handy with a knife as she used to be?  BF3 has ruined me for COD, I'm really happy with this game!  I seem to get better and better all the time.  :ph34r: 

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I'm on a COX network in Phoenix and recently went with what they recommended to purchase.

Netgear CG3000D

Have not had a single issue in the 1st 2 months of use.

I absolutely love the channel bonding to spread the load.

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More like cooking.  That's a lot of radio going on in there.

It almost has to be to get good coverage.  I used to have several dead spots.  I live in a ranch-style home that is way more wide than deep.  It really has no central location that makes a good spot for a single router.  So, there's one in the office, one upstairs, one in the living room, and one in the girl's bedroom.   Everyone is covered and the signal is strong everywhere.  Every router is separated by two channels to avoid RF interference.  Seems to work pretty well and we stay tanned year-round.  :)

Edited by =ADK= warspite

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