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Prophet

Best ISP - Suddenlink

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i had speed tests that were .5 - 25Mbps when i lived in new mexico and after about 2 hours and 4 techs came to the apartment they figured the only thing it could b was the wiring in the apartment and the owner wouldnt let them upgrade it. im sure that uve already had that checked and if so then its jsut that suddenlink is really that bad

 

Nope that't not the problem now. The problem is that the node has to many modems on it so its bandwidth gets squeezed out. They will have to probably reroute half the lines to another node to fix the speed problem when lots of people get online. Of course that will take a while.

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All,

 

Here is my review of Motorola's SB6121 "Surfboard" cable modem.

 

I would show an unboxing, but as you can imagine, it would be pretty boring.  Nothing in the box but the modem, power thingy, and a CAT5 jumper.  One thing about the box is ABSOLUTELY essential to know:  The "Customer S/N" (contains letters and numbers) is the serial number that matters to your ISP.  The manufacturer serial number (contains numbers only) is useless to your ISP.  No Customer S/N = you are screwed (at minimum, things will be very difficult getting your modem added/activated on your ISP's network).

 

Why do you care?  Well, if you buy your modem from a third party reseller (like Amazon.com) and not your ISP, your modem will almost certainly not be in your ISP's modem pool.  What is a modem pool, you ask?  Well, the pool is comprised of the modems bought and sold by your ISP.  It is very easy for your ISP to add the modems it has bought to its pool.  All they have to do is scan the barcode on the bottom of the modem's box... that's it.

 

Fortunately for me, I had all of this information.  The only bump in the road was that some dumb ass placed a sticker over the bar code, obscuring the vital Customer S/N.  After carefully peeling the f***ing sticker off (using brain surgeon-like caution), I was in business.  Freaking dumb ass sticker-person!!!!   :angry: 

 

Next came the voice mail trip through hell.  My ISP is Comcast, so I had to provide like 143 forms of picture ID and account numbers to every goddamn phone jockey in their labyrinthine support system I was handed off to.  Goddammit!!!  I would have rage quitted, but that would only mean I had to start at square one, and time was ticking...

 

Finally, I get a tech rep who specialized in the mundane chore of adding third party cable modems to the network.  I figured, how hard could this be?  I pass some numbers, she pings the modem, updates are applied, and bada-bing I'm up and running... right?  H E L L  N O !!!  I was on the phone with the modem girl  (who sounded like a 10th grader) for an hour and twenty f***ing minutes!!!!!  Goddammit!!!!!  She kept saying, "...this should just about do it... any second now"  then 20 goddamn minutes would go by before I heard her squeak again.  I used up every molecule of patience and self-control I had dealing with this moron... I had very little left for my job today, much to the suffering of my colleagues.  Oh well, they just had to deal with it.

 

Finally, after the fourth or so "...any second now..." Comcast's vaunted modem girl finally got my modem activated on the network.  The modem works awesome as far as I can tell, although I've only watched it for an hour or so.  Given what I talked about above, it should do a great job.

 

Well, what's good ramble/bitch session without a few lessons learned?  For you guys' benefit, here are some takeaways...

1. If you're not going to save the box your modem came in, take a picture of the barcode label that shows all of the S/Ns and the MAC address and save that pic in about 150 places.  Put it in a frame next to the picture of your dog (or your girlfriend).

2. If you didn't buy your modem from your ISP, for God's sake don't lose the Customer S/N (see #1 above).

3. If your ISP's modem prices are competitive and they have the modem you want, you are better off buying it from them.  If you do, odds are pretty good that the modem you bought will already be registered in your ISP's pool and activating it will be a snap.  You may even be able to activate it by yourself online if your ISP supports it.  Otherwise, prepare to have pure hell unleashed upon you by a marauding band of drooling idiots.

4. If you have Comcast, and you bought your modem from a third party seller, pack some emergency rations, then line up the jello shots baby, because not only will you be at if for awhile (you might get hungry), your patience will be tested to the very limits of what the Geneva Conventions loosely define as "torture."  This sort of pain is best dealt with by having plenty of adult libations near at hand.

 

Did I say that the modem itself was awesome?  Well, it is (so far).

 

You have been warned...

 

war

Edited by =ADK= warspite

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So this thread went from me raging at how "awesome" my ISP is to a freaking review on a modem. How the hell did that happen?

 

Um, your thread was inadvertently hijacked?  I was just answering a question... jeesh.   :unsure: 

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Also you forgot to mention the modem rental fee!  Not sure if Comcast has a monthly fee, but you can save the $4/month with TWC if you buy your own modem..

 

Glad to hear your modem is working out!  I may upgrade to if you haven't had any issues.  Only $77 at Amazon.

 

As far as ISP customer service goes, I think they're all the same: CRAPE.  TWC installed a line outside my house almost 2 weeks ago and never buried it.  It's running across my alley just waiting for someone to trip over and die.  I've called them 3 times since and they keep saying that they'll be out soon.  Well, still waiting!

 

Cable companies have no incentive to provide good customer service.  They got us by the balls.  Usually, you only have one or two options for ISP and they know this!

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Upgrading to that modem is worth it jiz! :)   

 

 

And TWC is sounding like what Century Link (formerly Quest) has and continues to do.      The cable/phone lines were just hung out back in the alley along the fences.  And then the box where everything runs from was covered with a plastic bag.       Definitely glad I don't use them! :) 

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I have run (among other things and many places) a number of hotels in Arizona, but the ones I remember most vividly are those that are/were down at the Tucson Airport in southern Arizona. 

 

They ALL had Quest - since back in the day, there was no other choice.  _All_ of the infrastucture was legacy copper-wire.  This condition held until as recently as ten years ago or less, and there was -NO- alternative.  You own a business, residence, run the Airport Authority, you had copper wire 19 friggn' 10  infrastructure. 

 

Why am I talking about this?  

Well because someone mentioned Quest (a name that is synonymous with infamy)  and because similar to the limited options some have for other utilities that have to do with supposedly 'modern' communication, there was and is simply no help without an option for an alternative service.  Well, and because I have the nick 'Dimwit' for a reason and AOB's map thingy is driving me up the wall...   (Sorry Prophet, but let this old guy get to his point so he can stop talking!)

 

What was it like without that option?

Card goes down, no phone service - maybe a few hours... could be longer.  Pole goes down, no phone service.  Could be an hour, might be a day or longer if in the right part of them thar hills.... 

 

But get this... every time it rained, yeah - RAINED - ... no phone service.  Not only no phone serivce for as LONG as it rained but some indeterminate amount of time stretching from a day to SEVERAL days AFTER it rained...

 

Because the system wasn't friggin'... waterproof? 

And because they couldn't always pinpoint where the trouble had occurred (because it occurred throught the system) and as we found out eventually, they were simply waiting for the  $#%*&****&$^%^ system to literally dry out! 

 

It was often remarked, while we waited for some word on someone's new-fangled cell phone, that it was a good thing we were in the desert where it rarely rains, otherwise we might still be using runners. 

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2598508538.png :rolleyes:

all the time i see US/CA ppl complaining about european internet..

well thats my speed up there, and i use it whit 2 PC's, both intensive internet users..

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I have run (among other things and many places) a number of hotels in Arizona, but the ones I remember most vividly are those that are/were down at the Tucson Airport in southern Arizona. 

 

They ALL had Quest - since back in the day, there was no other choice.  _All_ of the infrastucture was legacy copper-wire.  This condition held until as recently as ten years ago or less, and there was -NO- alternative.  You own a business, residence, run the Airport Authority, you had copper wire 19 friggn' 10  infrastructure. 

 

Why am I talking about this?  

Well because someone mentioned Quest (a name that is synonymous with infamy)  and because similar to the limited options some have for other utilities that have to do with supposedly 'modern' communication, there was and is simply no help without an option for an alternative service.  Well, and because I have the nick 'Dimwit' for a reason and AOB's map thingy is driving me up the wall...   (Sorry Prophet, but let this old guy get to his point so he can stop talking!)

 

What was it like without that option?

Card goes down, no phone service - maybe a few hours... could be longer.  Pole goes down, no phone service.  Could be an hour, might be a day or longer if in the right part of them thar hills.... 

 

But get this... every time it rained, yeah - RAINED - ... no phone service.  Not only no phone serivce for as LONG as it rained but some indeterminate amount of time stretching from a day to SEVERAL days AFTER it rained...

 

Because the system wasn't friggin'... waterproof? 

And because they couldn't always pinpoint where the trouble had occurred (because it occurred throught the system) and as we found out eventually, they were simply waiting for the  $#%*&****&$^%^ system to literally dry out! 

 

It was often remarked, while we waited for some word on someone's new-fangled cell phone, that it was a good thing we were in the desert where it rarely rains, otherwise we might still be using runners. 

 

My parents used to live in rural Louisiana, and every time it rained, they dropped off the grid for a couple of days so the lines, switches, or whatever could dry out.  I've lived that dream, my friend.

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